Blood Money

Blood Money

£8.99

MURDER FOR PROFIT Grandmotherly Dorothea Puente ran a boarding house in California. She also became known as the Black Widow of Sacramento because her tenants usually ended up resting beneath her lawn. Michael X modelled himself on his hero Malcolm X

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MURDER FOR PROFIT
Grandmotherly Dorothea Puente ran a boarding house in California. She also became known as the Black Widow of Sacramento because her tenants usually ended up resting beneath her lawn.
Michael X modelled himself on his black hero Malcolm X, but he was a thug who kidnapped and tortured a wealthy businessman before fleeing with a Tory MP’s daughter. He was eventually hanged for murder in Trinidad in 1975.
The acid bath murderer, John George Haigh, started his cold-blooded murders for profit as World War II drew to a close. In an attempt to escape the noose he confessed to drinking his victim’s blood.

INHERITANCE KILLERS
The Menendez brothers, Lyle and Erik, cold-bloodedly murdered their parents by shooting them in their Beverly Hill’s mansion. They then flaunted their new-found wealth by spending over $1 million in a year before being brought to justice.
The White House Farm was the scene of a bloody slaying for five members of the Bamber family. Jeremy Bamber was convicted of the murders but still protests his innocence, why?
Two pipe bombs blew apart the Benson family car, killing millionaire tobacco heiress Margaret Benson and her adopted son Scott. Amazingly Steven Benson, the sole remaining son and heir had exited the car moments before the catastrophe. But was it coincidence?

DEADLY KIDNAPPINGS
The Charles Lindbergh baby kidnapping was the sensation of the world’s press. In 1932 Lindbergh’s baby son was kidnapped. Despite receiving eleven more ransom notes their baby was eventually found with its skull broken.
The Black Panther was the police’s nickname for the ruthless kidnapper who had killed four people before kidnapping Leslie Whittle. She died naked in a drainage shaft, sparking off the hunt for Britain’s most notorious kidnapper.
In December 1969, 55 year old Muriel McKay was kidnapped. After receipt of the £1 million ransom note, it soon became clear that the kidnappers had mistaken Mr McKay for his media boss Rupert Murdoch. Despite the family’s payment of the ransom, Mrs McKay’s body was never recovered.