True Detective August 2006

True Detective August 2006

£3.50

This month in True Detective, how court procedures have changed over the years, but some people still mistakenly believe they can influence the outcome of a trial simply by writing to the judge.

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This month in True Detective, how court procedures have changed over the years, but some people still mistakenly believe they can influence the outcome of a trial simply by writing to the judge. This was never more evident than in the case of Kitty Byron, the Ruth Ellis of her day. When she was tried at the Old Bailey in December 1902 for her lover’s murder, Mr. Justice Darling was deluged with hundreds of letters from her sympathisers, some of whom even offered to take her place on the scaffold. And as in the case of Ruth Ellis more than 50 years later, the public sided with the woman wronged by her lover. Did Kitty, like Ruth Ellis, hang for her crime? Find out in part two of Untold Tales Of The Old Bailey, a fascinating collection of anecdotes, facts and secrets you just have to know.

Some 17 different countries from across the world appear in our catalogue of hangings outside Britain and Ireland during the month of August – testament to the universal preference for this method of execution down the ages. Take, for example, the hanging of Tehran Vampire Gholamreza Khoshrou. At dawn on August 13th, 1997 – just nine years ago – a crowd of 20,000 watched his execution. During a four-month reign of terror in the Iranian capital Khoshrou raped and murdered nine women and young girls after luring them into his car. However, his death was particularly barbaric. He was first taken to the roof of a building, pinned down over a concrete bench and given 214 strokes of a whip by the relatives of his victims. Then he was led to a crane, a noose put around his neck and the crane winched him 100 feet above ground level where he slowly strangled to death. As his body writhed in the hot sun the crowd applauded. And many among them felt he had got off lightly…

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