view basket | checkout   Search Site:   Advanced »
True Crime Library True Crimes - MagazinesTrue Crime MagazinesTrue Crime PublicationsTrue Crime Library - Magazines

True Crime Library - Newsletter

BROWSE OUR CRIME ARCHIVE
 All Crime Archives
 Victorian Hangings
 Chronicles of Crime
 Gone But Not Forgotten
 Worldwide Hangings

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
What did the robbery of a Royal Mail train travelling between Glasgow and London in the early hours of Thursday 8th August, 1963, at Bridego Railway Bridge, Buckinghamshire, become better known as?
Click here with your answer and win a prize!
CLICK HERE >>
WITH YOUR ANSWER AND WIN THIS BOOK
Send Us Your Crime Question
Got a crime-related question? Chances are the answers are in the True Crime Library! Just enter your details and the question you would like answered below.
CLICK HERE >>

Back issues
Visa
Mastercard
PayPal-Standard-Logo

Victorian Hangings


Search Victorian Hangings:
Show all stories from
Victorian Hangings »


Show all stories from
all sections »


Advanced Search »
Story Date:  Month:  Year:
OR: Show Section:

From 1837 to 1901 Queen Victoria presided over the world’s biggest empire – and during her 64-year reign approximately 1,100 judicial hangings were carried out in Great Britain and Ireland. Here we present a month-by-month calendar of the fascinating stories behind some of them, set frequently against a background of dire poverty, short trials and public executions...



Victorian Hangings: April

April 21st
21/4/1849
James Rush – Norwich


Jealousy and lust were inextricably mixed in the mind of James Rush whenever his mind turned to Stanfield Hall, owned by the local squire, Isaac Jermy.
Rush leased a couple of farms from Jermy and, heavily in debt, rent day was an event he dreaded. He decided to wipe out all the family living at the Hall and lay the blame on two Jermy dissidents, Thomas Jermy and John Larner, who both disputed Isaac’s claim to the Hall.
On the evening of November 28th, 1848, he donned a wig and cloak disguise, went to the Hall, and shot dead Isaac, his son and a servant, and wounded several other people.
Satisfied he wasn’t recognised and that he’d got away with murder, he rode back home to Potash Farm and his mistress’s bed. But as he snuggled under the blankets he was unaware that two of the servants at the Hall had seen through his disguise and had called the police. They arrived at dawn to arrest him.
“Don’t try to shoot,” they warned. “We are all armed.”
Rush was brought to trial at Norfolk Assizes in March, 1849, where one of the servants, Eliza Chastney, who had been maimed by one of his shots, was brought into court on a covered stretcher and pointed an accusing finger at him. “That’s the man who shot me,” she declared. “I know of no one else like him.”
Rush, who conducted his own defence, resorted to desperate methods, haranguing witnesses, including his own mistress, Emily Sandford, whom he cross-examined venomously for 12 hours. He failed to shake her damning evidence that he was away from Potash Farm for the crucial two hours from 7.30 to 9.30 when he was wreaking vengeance against the Jermys.
He then made an extraordinary 14-hour speech without stopping, repeatedly proclaiming his innocence and appealing dramatically to the Almighty for justice. At the end of it, the prosecuting counsel said wearily: “The present trial has exceeded in the annals of judicial long-suffering anything that has ever been experienced.”
The jury took only 10 minutes to find Rush guilty. He was hanged outside Norwich Castle on Saturday, April 21st, 1849, before a crowd of 30,000. As executioner William Calcraft tied the noose Rush grumbled: “Put the thing a little higher. Take your time. Don’t be in a hurr–” The drop cut short his last words.



Next story from:
April »
Previous story from:
April »
Next section from:
Victorian Hangings »
Previous section from:
Victorian Hangings »




Hot off the press

Hot off the press
True Detective Winter Special 2014

Buy Now!


Win a prize

Win a prize
Enter our free prize draw and win this book!
Click here


This week in crime
Week beginning: December 1st

The Man Who Knew Too Much...

The Overwrought Prisoner...

READ THESE STORIES & MORE HERE


True Crime Library, PO Box 735, London SE26 5NQ, UK.   Tel: +44(0) 20 8778 0514   Fax: +44(0) 20 8776 8260  Email: enquiries@truecrimelibrary.com
© True Crime Library 2014
Website by www.catfishcommerce.com
True Crime Home | Buy Crime Books Online | True Crime Magazines | True Crime Library | Victorian Hangings | True Crime Series | True Crime Murders | True Crime DVDs | Worldwide Hangings | True Crime Stories | Crime Publications | True Crime FAQ | About True Crime Library |
sitemap